King Phillip’s Cave   Leave a comment

Again, physical distancing constrains me from my beloved Northwest Trail at Borderland State Park…the crowd of cars parked there was definitely disconcerting.

At King Phillip’s Cave.  Chrysomelid is what I’m going with right now.  Best guess is a flea beetle, such as Capraita cf subvittata.

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Unknown moth. EDIT: “3251 – Barepatched Leafroller – Pseudexentera spoliana, extremely common around oaks”

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The spider is a Salticid jumping spider, probably in Pelegrina or in Eris (cf militaris).

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Perhaps a Pompilid?  For Pompilids, long tibial spines, “also note the antennae and wing venation. Totally lacking the “horse head” discosubmarginal cell of an ichneumon and the antennae aren’t segmented enough. ”  Also: “Auplopus sp. or another Ageniellinine“.

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Platysoma leconti, in Histeridae.  Love how pleasingly plump and chonky it is.

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Love, love this Halictid.  Perhaps Lasioglossum coeruleum, “dark blue sweat bee”.

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Probably Red-necked false blister beetle, Asclera ruficollis (Oedemeridae, Tenebrionidae).  Note the depressions in the pronotum.

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Scolytinae, Scolytini: Bark beetle.

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Non-insect photos:

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I call this one “Ascension”.

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Posted 2020-05-02 by gaurav1729 in Uncategorized

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